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Marlowe's Works

Marlowe's Works
Dido Woodcut

Dido

Dido, Queen of Carthage

History:

History:

Interpretation:

Interpretation:

Plot:

Plot:

References:

References:
Quote: Dido, Queen of Carthage, I.2.45-7

Sergestus:
Might we but once more see Aeneas' face,
Then would we hope to quite such friendly turns
As shall surpass the wonder of our speech.
Dido, Queen of Carthage, I.2.45-7

Dido, Queen of Carthage

Dido, Queen of Carthage

Act I Scene 2

Location: Further Along the Carthage Shore

The Other Trojan Ships Land

The remaining ships in the Trojan fleet have landed further along the Carthaginian coast. They have come ashore and have met Iarbus.

Virgil has Ilioneus speak a lengthy monologue to Queen Dido, but Marlowe adds a dramatic dimension by having Iarbus prompt explanations via his questioning, and also breaks up the monotony by having Ilioneus, Cloanthus, and Sergestus all supply answers in turn.

The Trojans explain that they come in peace. Their ships were sailing to Italy ("Hesperia term'd by us") when a sudden storm "dispers'd them all amongst the wreckful rocks" (I.2.29). They are unsure as to the fate of the rest of the fleet, including Aeneas. Iarbus accepts their friendly overtures, invites them to "banquet in our court", and says he will take them to Queen Dido.

 
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