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Marlowe's Works

Marlowe's Works
Dido Woodcut

Dido

Dido, Queen of Carthage

History:

History:

Interpretation:

Interpretation:

Plot:

Plot:

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References:
Quote: Dido, Queen of Carthage, III.3.80-1

Iarbus:
O God of heaven, turn the hand of fate,
Unto that happy day of my delight.
Dido, Queen of Carthage, III.3.80-1

Dido, Queen of Carthage

Dido, Queen of Carthage

Act III Scene 3

Location: The Woods

The Hunting Party: Iarbus is Humiliated

The party go hunting, and Dido's attention is solely on Aeneas. She invites the Lords to 'go before', because she wants to talk alone with Aeneas. Iarbus can hardly contain his jealousy, muttering asides, which further irritate the Queen. The pair end up bickering with each other; Dido is dismissively cruel ("Peasant, go seek companions like thyself" - III.3.21), and even Aeneas' attempts at diplomacy fail.

Aeneas' stock is further raised indirectly by others in the part, first by the boldness of the child whom they believe to be Ascanius: "How like his father speaketh he in all," observes Anna (III.3.41). Soon Achates weighs in by observing that this is the very same wood where Aeneas shot a deer to save his sailors' lives when they were first washed up on Carthage shore.

Dido orders her hunting party off in different directions, but orders Iarbus to return to the house. Once, alone he ruminates on what revenge he might take on Aeneas, or perhaps even on Dido. His soliloquy ends with his dreaming of Aeneas' death, whereupon Dido might after time "mould her mind unto new fancy's shape" (III.3.79), namely him.

 
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